Tag Archives: roasting

Roasted Broccoli & Irish Cheddar Soup

A thick, rich and comforting bowl. Like a velour track suit for your tongue.

Broccoli and cheese soup is a pretty solid standby in our humble opinion but (to borrow from Swingers) it’s the PG-13 guy of the soup world; you’re really hoping it does the trick but if you want something exciting you want the rated R guy. Not sure if roasting the vegetables will make a difference? Poppycock. Apprehensive about the strength of the Irish cheddar’s brogue? Balderdash. Pumpernickel croutons? Nerts to you. Work with us here, people; you know the drill by now.

Equipment Needed: 2  Baking Sheets, 5 QT Pot, Immersion Blender or Food Processor, Wooden Spoon, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board

Serving Suggestion: Individual Plating

Servings: 8

Suggested Wine Pairing: Pinot Noir, Beaujolais, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc

Suggested Beer Pairing: Dunkelwiess, Lager, Medium-bodied Ales

Ingredients:

  • 3 lbs broccoli ($2.99/lb)
  • 1 QT chicken stock ($3.29/32 oz)
  • 1 PT heavy cream ($2.99/PT)
  • 2 medium onions ($0.99/lb)
  • 6 cloves garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 1/3 C flour ($1.89/2 lbs)
  • 3 TBSP unsalted butter ($4.99/lb)
  • 4 TBSP extra virgin olive oil ($9.99/32 oz)
  • 1 lb Irish cheddar cheese ($11.99/lb)
  • 1 loaf fresh pumpernickel bread (about $3/loaf)
  • 1 TBSP garlic powder ($2/2.5 oz jar)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Crouton Preparation:

You can do this before, during or after you make your soup. It takes about 10 minutes so do whatever works best for you.

  • Preheat your oven to 400°F.
  • Take your loaf of pumpernickel and cut it into 1 inch cubes. Throw them in a mixing bowl and toss them with a solid drizzle of olive oil, garlic powder and salt.

Be careful not to over-oil the bread or it won't crisp up nicely.

  • Spread the croutons out evenly on a baking sheet and pop them in the oven for about 5 minutes, then check to see if they’re crunchy. If not, five them another few minutes but be careful not to leave them in too long. Burnt croutons don’t party well with soup.

Soup Preparation:

  • Preheat your oven to 425°F.
  • Wash the broccoli and remove the majority of the stems. Cut them into medium-sized florets and put them on your baking sheets.

Keep the broccoli in decent sized pieces, smaller chunks tend to burn when you roast them.

  • Peel and quarter your onions and place them on the backing sheets along with your broccoli. Mince your garlic cloves and spread evenly over the veggies on both sheets. Drizzle a healthy dose of olive oil over the whole lot, sprinkle with salt and pepper and throw them in the oven for 15-20 minutes until the veggies are nicely roasted.
  • While your broccoli is doing its thing, shred the cheese and set it aside for later.

If you can't find Irish cheddar, a nice English, Australian or just plain aged cheddar will do just fine.

  • Next it’s time to get started on your roux. Put the pot over low heat and add in the butter. Once it’s melted slowly stir in the flour a little at a time so it makes a paste then cook this until it’s a rich bronze color.  Pour in the cream and stir everything together. Bring the burner up to medium heat and stir relatively constantly if your veggies haven’t finished. You don’t want the cream to scald.

Use low heat and be patient with the roux; burnt flour doesn't help anything.

  • Once the veggies are done, throw them in the pot and add the chicken stock. Let everyone get friendly until the mixture comes to a boil. Once this happens remove it from the heat and get to work with your immersion blender (or food processor). You want to grind everything down to a consistent puree so don’t rush through this part.

Blend thoroughly. No one likes surprise chunks of stuff in an otherwise creamy soup.

  • Once you’ve got it to the consistency you want, put it back on the stove over low heat. Stir in the cheddar a small handful at a time until you’ve gotten through it all. Once the cheese has completely melted in dish it up and go to town. For bonus points drizzle a little walnut or truffle oil on top of each bowl.

Apple & Ale Brined Turkey

That's only half of the turkey. There were enough leftovers for four days of sandwiches.

We know we’re a little late on the whole Thanksgiving recipe bandwagon, but with the holiday season in full swing you can use our tasty beer brine recipe to punch up almost any roasted meat situation. Turkey, chicken, pork loin, pork chops, basically if it’s fowl or pork it can be brined. Since we were at our parents’ house we used a local microbrew – Sackets Harbor Brewing Company’s 1812 Amber Ale – to bring the thunder, while apple cider makes things appropriately autumnal.

Equipment Needed: Large Roasting Pan, Wooden Spoon, 3 QT Pot, Large Pot/Clean Bucket/Container (to hold the meat and brining solution in the fridge), Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Aluminum Foil, Meat Thermometer

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: Depends on how large your bird is

Suggested Wine Pairing: Beaujolais Nouveau, Pinot Noir, Oaky Chardonnays, Riesling

Suggested Beer Pairing: Amber Ale, Brown Ale, Winter Ale, Belgian Browns

Ingredients:

NOTE: We brined a 19.5 lb bird with this recipe. We recommend halving it if you’re preparing anything under 10 lbs, just be prepared for a much more concentrated flavor.

  • 1 six-pack of amber or brown ale (72 oz) (price varies)
  • 8 C apple cider ($3.49/gallon)
  • 2 carrots ($1.99/lb)
  • 3 celery stalks ($2.99/lb)
  • 2/3 C kosher salt ($2.29/48 oz box)
  • 2/3 C sugar ($2.39/2 lb box)
  • 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary ($4/package)
  • 1 TBSP whole black peppercorns ($3.69/2.25 oz jar)
  • Ice (free; amount will vary)
  • Water (free; amount will vary)

Preparation:

  • You’ll want to brine your meat for an absolute minimum of 1 hour and as much as a couple of days. We brined our turkey for about 18 hours which made for some very tender meat and a faint cider flavor. Knowing this you’ll need to start making the brine about an hour before you plan to soak your meat.
  • Add your sugar, salt, four beers and four cups of cider to the 3 quart pot. Stir well and put it over high heat. Continue stirring until the solids have dissolved and bring the mix to a boil, making sure that nothing burns.

Beer makes everything better, especially turkey.

  • While the mix is brewing, prep your turkey by giving it a good rinse and removing the giblets.
  • Remove the brining solution from the heat and transfer it to your bucket/pot/receptacle. After about 15 minutes of cooling add the other two beers and remaining four cups of cider. Throw in about six cups of ice and give it a good stir to melt the cubes.

Cool things quicker with an ample helping of ice.

  • Once the solution has reached room temperature (or cooler) submerge the bird breast-side down and add the rosemary and peppercorns. You want to make sure the meat is fully submerged so if there’s anything exposed top it off with water and a bit more cider if you desire. Pop that puppy in the fridge and let the goodness soak in.

Top it off with cider for a more pronounced flavor.

  • When you’re ready to cook your turkey remove it from the brine, rinse it thoroughly and pat it dry. Preheat the oven to 325°F.

During the pat-down we could swear the turkey yelled, "Don't touch my junk!"

  • Cut your butter into 1/4 inch pats. Carefully separate the skin from the meat and insert the pieces in between to keep things juicy while it cooks. Cut the celery and carrots into three-inch pieces and stuff them into the cavity of the turkey.

This money shot was brought to you by the letter "Butter" and the number "Moist."

  • Line the roasting pan with enough aluminum foil to line the bottom and cover the bird. Place the turkey in (backside down if you need reminding) and cover with the excess foil.
  • Pop that gobbler in the oven and cook it for approximately 15 minutes for every pound. Check it after 2 hours to make sure it hasn’t cooked too quickly. It’s ready when the internal temperature is 165°F when taken from the thigh. To make sure the skin gets nice and crispy peel back the foil for the last 30 minutes of roasting. Once you’ve taken it out of the oven cover it back up with foil and let it rest for a minimum of 10 minutes to let the juices redistribute. Carve, be thankful for your food and friends, and enjoy.

Wasabi Soy Almonds

Salty, spicy, nutty roasted goodness for any occasion.

Our mild addiction to the food section in Target led us to this recipe. Salty, spicy and nutty this snack is equally suited as a starter for an Asian-inspired meal or snack for the big game. Avoid missing the third quarter by remembering to use aluminum foil to protect your baking sheet.

Equipment Needed: Baking Sheet, Aluminum Foil, Mixing Bowl, Microwave-safe Container (to melt the butter), Fork

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 6 ish

Suggested Wine Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Suggested Beer Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Ingredients:

  • 10 oz almonds ($3.99/10 oz)
  • 1/4 C soy sauce ($2.50/10 oz)
  • 3 TBSP unsalted butter ($4.99/lb)
  • 2 TBSP wasabi powder ($3/1 oz jar)

Preparation:

  • Preheat your oven to 375°F.
  • Put the butter in a microwave-safe device (we used a coffee mug) and melt it completely.
  • Mix in the soy sauce and wasabi powder. Put your almonds in the mixing bowl and line the baking pan with aluminum foil.

Pour the soy and wasabi in and mix thoroughly so there are no clumps.

  • Pour the mix over the almonds and toss them to coat evenly. Pop those puppies in the oven for 5 minutes, stir them and bake for another 5. Wait for them to cool before serving. If the spirit moves you, toss them with a little sea salt and some extra wasabi powder to taste.

Toss the nuts with the sauce to coat evenly.

Carolina-style Honey Mustard Pulled Pork with Coleslaw

Nirvana on a bun.

Easy. Repeat after us, “easy.” When you realize that the preparation of the accompaniment is more complicated than something as delicious as pulled pork you’ll punch yourself in the face for not making this earlier. This is a sweet and spicy play on Carolina-style (read: vinegar-based) barbecue that’s a no-fail FAF (fire and forget; there, we can make catchphrases too).

Equipment Needed: 3 QT Dutch Oven or Heavy Oven-proof Pot, Colander, Mixing Bowl, Cheese Grater, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Spoon, 2 Forks

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 6

Suggested Wine Pairing: Old Vine Zinfandel, Shiraz, Oaky Chardonnay

Suggested Beer Pairing: Pale Ale, Amber Ale, Red Ale, Scotch Ale

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 lbs boneless pork butt (usually around $2/lb)
  • 1 head cabbage ($1.50/lb)
  • 2 large carrots ($1.99/lb)
  • 1 medium onion ($0.99/lb)
  • 1 clove garlic ($1.99/lb)
  • 1/2 C mayonnaise ($3.99/15 oz)
  • Juice of 1/2 a lemon ($0.50/each)
  • 2 TBSP white vinegar ($1.99/32 oz)
  • 1 C honey mustard ($3/12 oz)
  • 1/2 C sugar ($2.39/2 lb box)
  • 1/4 C light brown sugar ($1.39/lb)
  • 3/4 C apple cider vinegar ($2.79/32 oz)
  • 1/4 C water (free)
  • 2 1/2 TBSP chili powder ($3/3.5 oz jar)
  • 1 TSP cayenne pepper ($3/2 oz jar
  • 1 TSP Worcestershire sauce ($3.75/10 oz)
  • Hamburger buns (optional) ($2.89/8 pack)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Pork Preparation:

  • Preheat your oven to 325°F.
  • Whisk together the following ingredients in your dutch oven and simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes: apple cider vinegar, both sugars, honey mustard, chili powder, cayenne pepper, Worcestershire sauce, water, garlic clove (peeled and halved), and 2 TBSP black pepper.

    Whisk that sauce up and make sure the bottom doesn't burn.

  • While your barbecue brew is cooking away salt and pepper your pork thoroughly. Once the sauce is ready pop that little piggy in and throw it in the oven for 2 – 2 1/2 hours or until you can slide a fork into it with no resistance.
  • Using two forks, pull the meat apart until it’s fully shredded and has reabsorbed some of the barbecue sauce. Serve by itself or on a bun with a healthy scoop of slaw.

Shred that little piggy up real nice-like.

Coleslaw Preparation:

  • Peel and wash your carrots, then shred them down on your cheese grater.

A cheese grater makes short work of the carrots and keeps the pieces consistent.

  • Wash the cabbage and  cut it off the core in quarters. Turn each piece on its side and slice into thin pieces (as thin as you can get without losing any fingertips).

Cut that cruciferous beauty into thin slices.

  • Peel and cut the onion into eighths and slice into thin pieces (same fingertip rule applies).
  • Throw everything in a mixing bowl, add the vinegar, lemon juice and mayo and stir it all together. Adjust the creaminess with more or less mayo and vinegar accordingly. Salt and pepper to taste and serve alongside (or on top of as we prefer) that beautiful pork butt.

Roasted Bison Marrow Bones

Yes, they're bones...and they're delicious. Trust us.

Fact: marrow is an acquired taste. Additional fact: we believe that you should acquire a taste for marrow. This preparation couldn’t be easier, nor could it yield more delicious results. We came across some bison bones from Elk Trails Ranch at the Union Square Greenmarket and splurged on the accoutrements.  The end product elicited satisfied grunts of moans of approval from two marrow virgins. Mission accomplished.

Equipment Needed: 2 Baking Sheets, Aluminum Foil, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board

Serving Suggestion: Family Style (casual) of Individual Plating (fancy)

Servings: 6-8

Suggested Wine Pairing: Heavier reds like  Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignon and Malbec (or an acidic white like a Sauvignon Blanc if you’re feeling adventurous)

Suggested Beer Pairing: Stouts, porters, dark Belgians (to balance the fattiness) and wheat beers (to cut through the fattiness)

Ingredients:

  • 2-3lbs Marrow bones ($5/lb)
  • Fresh flat leaf parsley (about $3/bunch)
  • about 4 TBSP Extra virgin olive oil ($9.99/34 oz bottle) (we got fancy and used blood orange-infused olive oil)
  • about 3 TBSP Balsamic vinegar ($6/17 oz bottle) (fancier still: we used fig-infused balsamic vinegar)
  • 1/4 lb Microgreens (about $10/lb) (yes, these are some expensive leaves; use regular mixed greens if you’re not splurging)
  • 1 baguette (about $2)
  • Sea salt (around $5/26 oz) (prices vary widely depending on the salt)
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Bonus Points: 1 garlic bulb ($2.99/lb)
  • Bonus Points: truffle oil (about $20/8 oz)

Preparation:

  • Preheat oven to 450° F. Cover a baking sheet in foil so you don’t have to scrub it later.
  • Salt and pepper each side of the marrow bone and place it larger side down on the baking sheet. Put in the oven for 15 minutes.

Salt, pepper, roast. That's it.

  • BONUS POINTS: Cut the tops off an entire bulb of garlic, drizzle truffle oil over the top and wrap in aluminum foil. Place in the oven at the same time as the bones, making sure to place the edges of the foil facing up so the oil doesn’t drip out and start smoking. Roast for the full 15 minutes, unwrap and serve as a spread for the baguette pieces.

Slice the tops off of an entire bulb.

Wrap the garlic in aluminum foil and let the truffling commence.

  • Slice your baguette diagonally into equal pieces and place on your other baking sheet. Drizzle lightly with olive oil and place on the second rack in the oven at the 10 minute mark.
  • Rinse your microgreens. Mix the olive oil and vinegar together and toss with the greens. Serve on the side of each individual bone or line the bottom of the serving tray as a bed for the bones.
  • To Serve: Give each guest a spoon and butter knife to get the marrow out and on to their toast. Serve with the best sea salt you can afford (we know that sounds pretentious, but more expensive salts, unfortunately, often have tastier, more unique savory elements. We used a Hawaiian black salt).