Tag Archives: stove top

Leek and Bacon Butter

Welcome to your new obsession: trying to figure out the myriad things you can use to make compound butter

Welcome to your new obsession: trying to figure out the myriad things you can use to make compound butter.

We hope you came off your January detox as quickly as we did because we’ve got one more delicious ditty to add to the seemingly infinite lists of food trends for the year: compound butter. Yes folks, it is possible to actually make butter more delicious and it simply entails mixing things in with it. To absolutely no one’s surprise we chose bacon as our gateway compound. But wait, there’s more! We also caramelized some leeks to give it a sweet and slightly vegetal backbone. You can use this to make any dish more interesting (potatoes, roasted veggies and pasta come to mind) but we’re betting you’ll do what we did and just end up eating most of it on fresh bread. Resolutions be damned.

Equipment Needed: Frying Pan, Spatula, Serving Spoon, Small Mixing Bowl, Medium Mixing Bowl, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Parchment Paper or Wax Paper, Plastic Wrap

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 8-10

Suggested Wine Pairing: whatever you’re drinking

Suggested Beer Pairing: whatever you’re drinking

Ingredients:

  • 1 stick and 3 TBSP unsalted butter (divided) ($4.99/lb)
  • 1 small leek (about $2.99/lb)
  • 1 clove garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 4 slices thick cut bacon ($7.99/lb)

Preparation:

  • Do two things before you start to save yourself a lot of mess 1)Put a stick of butter in your medium mixing bowl. You want it room temperature when you’re ready to make things compound. 2) Lay out a 12 inch piece of parchment paper so you’re literally ready to roll once the leeks have melted down.
  • Cut the green woody end and the root end off of the leek. Halve it lengthwise and then cut each piece into thin half-moon slices. Put them in your small mixing bowl and pour cold water over everything. Swish them around to loosen the dirt and then drain and pat them dry.
Leeks have a knack for getting dirt in them so you may need to rinse twice.

Leeks have a knack for getting dirt in them so you may need to rinse twice.

  • Peel and mince your garlic clove. Set it aside until later in the leek melting process.
  • Slice the bacon strips crosswise into thin pieces, then chop those pieces into super tiny chunks so they incorporate easier. Place them in the frying pan over medium heat and crisp them up for about 5-8 minutes (you want them crunchy; this isn’t for debate). Remove the pieces and set them on a paper towel to drain, but leave the grease in the pan.
Chop the bacon into tiny pieces so it mixes, spreads and is easier to eat.

Chop the bacon into tiny pieces so it mixes, spreads and is easier to eat.

  • Add the sliced leeks to the pan along with 3 tablespoons of butter. Stir everything around so it’s well-coated and let it sit for a couple of minutes. Stir, let sit, and repeat for about 8-10 minutes then turn the heat to low, add the garlic and cook for another 10-12 minutes until the leeks are well caramelized.
  • Remove the frying pan from the heat and let it cool to room temperature. Add the veggies and the bacon to your small mixing bowl with the softened butter. Using a spoon, slowly fold all that deliciousness evenly into the butter and plop it down on the parchment paper you laid out.
  • The next part is more art than science. Think like you’re rolling up a piece of paper or poster and roll the parchment paper around the compound butter.
Hold the ends of the paper and roll down to meld the butter together.

Hold the ends of the paper and roll down to meld the butter together.

  • Once you’re satisfied with the tubeness of your butter, put a piece of plastic wrap around the whole lot and twist the ends to seal everything up. Let it sit in the fridge for at least an hour before you serve. It’ll last in the icebox for up to 5 days but that probably won’t be an issue.

Cardamom Simple Syrup

So artisan you’re gonna have to grow a handlebar mustache and start charging your friends $15 a drink.

Simple syrup is just that; simple. Mix equal parts water and sugar, bring to a boil, et voilà, you’ve got a sweetener for cocktails, drinks, dishes, whatever. We had some green cardamom pods leftover from an earlier experiment and decided to complicate our simple syrup a bit. The results are spicy, herbal and slightly citrusy, mixing well with gin and vodka (hint, hint).

Equipment Needed: 1 QT Pot, Chef’s Knife, Whisk, Strainer, Jar/Squeeze Bottle/Vessel To Hold The Finished Product In

Ingredients:

  • 1 C water
  • 1 C sugar ($2.39/2 lbs)
  •  1/4 C green cardamom pods (the price varies but it will be significantly cheaper if you have an awesome spice store like Kalustyan’s nearby; about $6.99/oz)

Preparation:

  • Add the water and sugar to your pot and whisk it together quickly to dissolve some of the sugar.
  • Place the pot over high heat. Take your cardamom pods and break them open. Add the pods and their innards to the mix and whisk everything together. Bring it to a boil stirring occasionally. Turn the stove off and let the syrup cool.

Stir it up to make sure the sugar dissolves and the cardamom is at maximum absorption.

  • Once your syrup has cooled to about room temperature place the strainer over your container of choice and pour the mixture in. Make sure you got all the cardamom pieces out, seal it up and pop it in the fridge. It should last a few months kept cool in an airtight container.

Use a strainer; no one likes chewy syrup.

Steakhouse Burger

Everything that is good and right in the world in the soft embrace of two buns.

This shining example of burger perfection has all the best qualities of an old school steak house meal. Bacon and blue cheese a la wedge salad? Check. Marbled beef seasoned and cooked to perfection? Check. Just enough vegetables to make you feel slightly healthy? Check. Shake up a dirty martini, grab a napkin and go to town.

Equipment Needed: Frying Pan, Large Mixing Bowl, Small Mixing Bowl, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Wooden Spoon

Serving Suggestion: Individual Plating

Servings: 4

Suggested Wine Pairing: Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Montepuciano D’Abruzzo

Suggested Beer Pairing: Brown Ales and Porters are our preference for this one, but you have to really try to make a bad beer pairing with a burger.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. ground beef (we recommend an 80/20 mix) ($3.99/lb)
  • 1 medium onion ($0.99/lb)
  • 1 medium shallot ($2.99/lb)
  • 3 cloves garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 1 lb. crimini or bably bella mushrooms ($2.99/lb)
  • 8 strips thick cut applewood smoked bacon ($7.99/lb)
  • 8 oz blue cheese (we used an Italian blue, verde capra)($8.99/lb)
  • 2 TBSP Montreal steak seasoning ($about $3.99/3 oz jar)
  • 3 TBSP extra virgin olive oil ($8.99/32 oz)
  • 3 TBSP balsamic vinegar ($8.99/32 oz)
  • 2 TBSP honey ($4.39/12 oz)
  • 4 hamburger buns ($3.19/8 pack)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Preparation:

  • Peel and mince the garlic; peel and quarter your onion, then cut into thin slices. Brush off the crimini mushrooms with a wet paper towel to remove any excess dirt. Slice those puppies into thin strips too and mix in with the onions and garlic.

Slice the mushrooms thinly so they cook down easier and caramelize nicely.

  • Place your frying pan over medium heat and add the olive oil. Throw in your veggies, sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper and stir thoroughly to coat with the oil. Cook everything down for about 5 minutes then drizzle the balsamic vinegar and  honey over the whole lot and cook until caramelized, stirring occasionally (about 10 more minutes). Place in a bowl and set aside.

Add some bee juice to even things out and complement the sharpness of the blue cheese.

  • In a large mixing bowl add the beef, grate in the shallot, add the steak seasoning, a healthy pinch of salt and pepper and mix it together with your hands. Do it until the spices and shallot are well incorporated but don’t overwork the meat, it’ll get gummy and will give your burger a weird texture.

Either grate or mince the shallot so it incorporates easily with the beef.

  • Take the beef and divide into quarters. Form the patties in the palms of your hands; use your thumb to put a divot in the center so your burger doesn’t bulge when it’s cooked. Set the patties aside on a plate.
  • Place your veggie frying pan back over medium heat and add your bacon. Don’t overcrowd it, cook the bacon in batches until crisp and set it aside on paper towels to drain. Leave the bacon fat in the pan.
  • Keep your frying pan over medium heat. If the bottom isn’t evenly coated in bacon fat add a little olive oil and plunk down your hamburger patties. Cook for about 4 minutes on each side for medium; whatever your doneness preference, only flip the burgers once. When cooked to your liking remove from heat and let the patties sit for a couple minutes. Take this chance to toast the buns a bit in the frying pan to soak up all the remaining burgerness.

Like steak, you only want to flip your burgers once to avoid uneven, overcooking.

  • Pop the beef on top of the bun and add a thick layer of blue cheese. We like using an Italian blue, verde capra, for this one because it gets creamy and almost sauce-like when it melts. You can find it in most specialty grocery stores or cheese shops but regular blue cheese will work just as well.
  • Pile on a good amount of mushrooms and onions and top it with a couple of strips of bacon, broken in half to fit easier. If you’ve made it this long without stuffing your face, put the top bun on so the burger’s easier to hold and dig in.

Frito Pie

So wrong, yet so right.

We’ve been intrigued with this Southern delicacy ever since we first saw it on the menu at one of our favorite dive bars in Williamsburg. This meaty pile of semi-shameful indiscretion is as delicious as it is sounds, whether you’re under the influence or not. Resist the urge to overthink the chili and let a few simple ingredients do work. Just be forewarned, this may replace nachos as your favorite meat/cheese/corn chip combination.

Equipment Needed: 5 Qt Pot with Lid, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Cheese Grater, Can Opener, Wooden Spoon

Serving Suggestion: Individual Plating

Servings: 6

Suggested Wine Pairing: You’re eating Frito pie; you should just drink what you want

Suggested Beer Pairing: Whatever’s clever. (see: Eating Frito Pie)

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. ground beef (we recommend an 80/20 mix) ($3.99/lb)
  • 1 large onion ($0.99/lb)
  • 1 jalapeno pepper ($2.99/lb)
  • 4 cloves garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 1 15 oz can of black beans ($1.19/15 oz can)
  • 1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes ($2.49/28 oz can)
  • 1 6 oz can can tomato paste ($0.99/6 oz can)
  • 1 TBSP cumin ($3.50/2 oz jar)
  • 1 TBSP chili powder ($1.50/4 oz jar)
  • 2 TSP liquid smoke ($2.89/3 oz)
  • 1 TBSP paprika ($3/2 oz jar)
  • 1 TSP cayenne pepper ($2/3.5 oz jar)
  • 1 TBSP balsamic vinegar ($8.99/32 oz))
  • 1 TSP sugar ($2.39/2 lb box)
  • 1 10.5 oz bag Frito corn chips ($3.29/10.5 oz bag)
  • 8 oz cheddar cheese ($8.99/lb)
  • 3 TBSP extra virgin olive oil ($8.99/32 oz)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Preparation:

  • Finely dice your onion and mince your garlic. Wash your jalapeno thoroughly, halve it and remove the seeds and ribs (leave the seeds in if you want a spicier chili).

Finely dice the jalapeno so it melds easier in the chili.

  • Put the pot over medium heat and add your olive oil. Throw in the onions first and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Stirring every minute or so, cook the onions for 5 minutes then add the garlic and jalapeno. Cook everything down for another 5 minutes and add in your beef.
  • Salt and pepper the beef, making sure to break it up with your spoon. Stir everything together so the veggies are mixed throughout the meat. Add in the cumin, chili powder, paprika, and cayenne pepper and give it another good stir. Cook the meat mixture until it’s lightly browned, stirring occasionally (about 10 minutes or so).
  • Spoon in the tomato paste and pour in the crushed tomatoes. Add the liquid smoke, vinegar, sugar, a few healthy pinches of salt and a good dose of black pepper. Turn the heat to low and let everything simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally so the bottom doesn’t burn.

Use diced or break up whole canned tomatoes if you want chunkier chili.

  • While your chili is bubbling away shred up the cheddar and set it aside in a bowl for later.
  • Drain the beans and stir them in to the mix. Taste everything and re-season as you see fit. Once the flavors are to your liking cook it down for another 10 minutes to finish it off.

We prefer black beans for this one but go nuts with your legume of preference.

  • Take a handful of Fritos and put them in a soup bowl or plate. Spoon a couple healthy heaps of chili over the top of them and sprinkle cheese over the whole lot.

Devil Ducks (aka, Deviled Duck Eggs)

So much delicious duck in such a tiny package.

We’ve had a soft spot in our hearts for deviled eggs ever since we can remember having our Nana’s at family Christmas gatherings. The traditional recipe is hard to beat but we recently had the good fortune of coming into the possession of duck eggs, which oddly coincided with our discovery of possibly one of the greatest things in the world, D’Artagnan’s duck bacon. You can make the below recipe with good ‘ol fashioned chicken eggs and pig bacon, but we couldn’t leave well enough alone. Just be careful about making more than one egg per person; duck eggs are larger and fattier so they can be overwhelming once you go back for seconds.

Equipment Needed: 5 Qt Pot with Lid, Frying Pan, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Large Fork, Mixing Bowl, Paper Towels

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 6

Suggested Wine Pairing: Crisp and acidic whites to combat the fattiness (e.g., Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris) or lighter reds

Suggested Beer Pairing: Something crisp like an American Lager or Pilsner

Ingredients:

  • 6 duck eggs (these are about $1 each, substitute with chicken eggs at will)
  • 6 strips D’Artagnan duck bacon ($12.99/8 oz)(you can also use regular bacon, you serf)
  • 1/2 C mayonnaise ($3.99/15 oz jar)
  • 2 TBSP dijon mustard ($3.85/8 oz jar)
  • 1-2 TBSP horseradish ($1.79/6 oz jar)

Preparation:

  • Fill your pot about 2/3 full with water, gently place your duck eggs in (you don’t want them to accidentally crack) and put it over high heat, covered.
  • While your water is coming to a boil place the frying pan over medium heat and add the duck bacon. This can be a little on the rarer side, so be careful not to char it up (2-3 minutes per side should be fine). Put the cooked pieces on paper towels to drain.
  • Once your water is boiling let it go for another 5 minutes then turn it off and let the eggs sit for another 5 minutes in the hot water. Once your 10 minutes is up carefully pour out the water and replace it with cold water to shock the eggs and stop the cooking. We even pop them in the fridge sometimes to speed up the process (this is probably some violation of classic technique but whatever).

Be sure to use a pot that gives the eggs room to move a bit.

  • In the mixing bowl stir together the mustard, mayo and horseradish. We recommend doing about half of each at first to make sure you like the taste and then add more of each to your liking.
  • Once your eggs are cool shell them and cut them in half. Take 4 of the yolks and toss them in the mixing bowl with your mayohorsetard sauce. Crush them up and stir it together with your fork until everything’s integrated. Add more yolk if you prefer but you can also save them for a salad later (remember that you’ve now got a lot of filling for 12 egg halves).
  • Take your bacon and chop it in to tiny crumbles for your topping.

It's safe to say that our lives are now better knowing that duck bacon is a thing.

  • Using your fork, scoop some of the yolk/sauce mixture into each egg half and set them on a plate. Sprinkle a healthy dose of bacon on top of each and go duck yourself.

Fill 'er up.

Greek Vegetable Pizza

Like having a Mediterranean garden on a little island of dough.

We can’t eat meat all the time, no matter how much we wish it was possible. For those times when the circles of meatlessness and pizza overlap on your Venn diagram of hunger (how’s that for an intelligent reference) try our vegetable version. With classic Greek flavors this easy crowd pleaser is also great for using up leftover veggies (zucchini, peppers, extra greens, scallions, we could go on…) with minimal effort and maximum results.

Equipment Needed: Baking Sheet or Pizza Pan or Pizza Stone, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Tongs, Mixing Bowl, Plastic Wrap, Serving Spoon

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 4 people (or 2 Brown Brothers)

Suggested Wine Pairing: Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, Beaujolais

Suggested Beer Pairing: Pilsners, Light Lagers  

Ingredients:

  • 1 pre-made ball of pizza dough (about $1.99/package)
  • 1 medium red pepper ($3.99/lb)
  • 1 small onion ($0.99/lb)
  • 1 C pitted olives ($5.99/lb)
  • 1/2 C sundried tomatoes (about $5/3 oz jar)
  • 6 oz feta cheese ($7.99/lb)
  • 1/2 C  our roasted garlic and artichoke cream (you can just mince artichokes with olive oil or buy a spread if you prefer)(about $6/8 0z jar)
  • 1 TSP dried oregano ($3.50/1 oz jar)
  • Salt
  • Pepper
Preparation:
  • Preheat your oven to 425°F.
  • Before anything else, wash off your red pepper and put it directly over the burner on your stove. If you don’t have a gas stove, pop into the oven directly on the baking rack for about 10-15 minutes. You want the skin to start burning and blistering so keep a close eye on it and rotate when one side gets too done; a crackling, popping noise means you’re headed in the right direction.

Let the pepper char up completely on each side before you turn it.

  • When your pepper is properly charred, put it in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap to sweat it out. While you’re waiting for it to steam peel and slice your onion crosswise into thin strips and do the same with your sundried tomatoes (the cutting into strips part, not the peeling part).
  • After about 5 minutes remove the pepper from the bowl, run it under hot water and rub the skin off. Cut in half lengthwise, remove the ribs and seeds and slice into thin strips lengthwise.
  • Peel your onion and slice it into thin discs, halfwise.
  • Throw a little flour on your baking sheet and spread out the pizza dough into the shape your heart desires. Drizzle some olive oil over the top and pop it into the oven for 5 minutes to let it firm up a bit.
  • Take the dough out and coat it with your artichoke spread. Layer on the red pepper strips, onion discs, sundried tomatoes and olives.

Crush the olives before you put them on so they cook down better and cover more pizza real estate.

  • Crumble some feta over the whole lot and sprinkle some dried oregano evenly over the top. Pop it back in the oven for another 10 minute, or until the crust is crisped to your liking. Pull it out, slice it up and take it down.

You could buy the pre-crumbled stuff but where's the fun in that?

Short Rib Chili

A bowl full of beefy awesomeness.

Short ribs are a favorite of ours because the only way to screw them up is to undercook them. Oh no, you let it go for 3 hours instead of 2? That just means you’ll be able to cut it with a spoon, lucky. Also, with the Super Bowl around the corner you’ve got the perfect excuse for some serious chili making, which also requires patience and the ability to drink beer while you’re waiting. Our work here is done.

Equipment Needed: 5 QT Pot w/ lid, Frying Pan, Tongs, Wooden Spoon, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Paper Towels

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 10-12

Suggested Wine Pairing: Cabernet Sauvignon, Old Vine Zinfandel, Malbec, Shiraz, Barolo

Suggested Beer Pairing: Stout, Porter, Dopplebock, Winter Ales, Brown Ale

Ingredients:

  • 3 lbs bone-in beef short ribs ($5.99/lb)
  • 22 oz dark beer (we used a Lagunitas Imperial Stout; price varies)
  • 3-4 C beef broth ($2.99/32 oz)
  • 2 15.5 oz cans black beans ($1.39/can)
  • 6 slices of thick cut bacon ($6.99/lb)
  • 1 large red onion ($1.29/lb)
  • 1 large green pepper ($1.99/lb)
  • 6 cloves garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 1 28 oz can of diced tomatoes ($3.49/can)
  • 6 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce ($2.99/can)
  • 1 TBSP liquid smoke ($2.89/3 oz)
  • 1 TBSP apple cider vinegar ($2.89/32/oz)
  • 1/2 C Grade A maple syrup (about $7/8 oz)
  • 1 TSP cayenne pepper ($2/3.5 oz jar)
  • 2 TSP chili powder ($1.50/4 oz jar)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Preparation:

  • At the butcher (or meat counter) ask them to cut your ribs into 2 inch chunks. When you get them home, season each piece liberally with salt and pepper on all sides.
  • Dice your onion and pepper, and mince the garlic. While you’re at it, cut your bacon strips in to 1 inch chunks for later.
  • Put your pot over high heat and coat the bottom in olive oil. Taking a few pieces at a time so you don’t crowd the pot, sear the ribs on every side (you’ll need a plate or bowl to hold those that are finished). Once you’ve browned everything throw in the garlic and onion and scrape up the brown bits off the bottom. Let them sweat for a minute then put the ribs back in the pot.

Once the meat is down, don't move it. And don't you dare flip it more than once.

  • Pour in the beer and enough beef stock to cover everything. Stir in maple syrup, cayenne pepper, chili powder and liquid smoke. Reduce the heat to low, pop the lid on and let it simmer for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.
  • While your beef is braising (aka, cooking in liquid after being seared) put a frying pan over medium head and throw in your bacon pieces. Cook them until they’re crispy and then drain them on a paper towel and set aside for later.
  • When you can pull the beef apart with a fork, pull the pieces out of the juice and put it on a cutting board. Remove the bones and chop up the meat into bite-sized pieces. Toss them back in the liquid.

Chop that meat up into tiny little melt-in-your-mouth morsels.

  • Drain one of the cans of beans and add them to the pot. Pour in the second can, bean juice and all. Add the green peppers.
  • Chop up the chipotle peppers and toss them in the pot. We also like to spoon in a little of the adobo sauce that comes in the can.

Mince the peppers into a fine paste and stir them in.

  • Let things simmer for another 20 minutes and adjust your flavors to taste. Add the bacon bits just before serving to add some texture to the bowl. Spoon into big bowls and serve with cornbread, or just ladle from the pot into your mouth.

Truffled Parmigiano Popcorn

If you've got five minutes you too can be happy.

Oh how we pity those that have lost touch with popcorn’s pure roots and resort to the chemical-ridden quasi-corn that has its own special button on most microwaves. Lost is the simple pleasure of shaking a pot, watching the kernels explode in light fluffy goodness right before your eyes and adjusting flavors to something other than “salty and yellow.” If you need any more inspiration than truffle and Parmigiano cheese to class things up then we can’t help you. Treat yourself and carve out a whole five minutes of your day to do it the right way; we promise you’ll never go back to the bag.

Equipment Needed: 3 QT Pot with Lid, Microplane or Cheese Grater, Small Microwaveable Dish, Large Serving Bowl

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 2-3 normal people (though we can each eat a batch)

Suggested Wine Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Suggested Beer Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 C un-popped popcorn ($2.29/28 oz)
  • 1/4-1/2 C grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese ($12.99/lb)
  • 2 TBSP canola oil ($4.89/48 oz)
  • 1/2 TBSP butter ($4.99/lb)
  • 2-3 TBSP truffle oil (about $23/8 oz but totally worth it)
  • 2 TSP dried parsley flakes ($1/0.5 oz jar)
  • Sea Salt (about $3/26 oz)
  • Black Pepper

Preparation:

  • Place your pot uncovered over medium-high heat for a minute to warm things up. Add your canola oil to evenly coat the bottom and give it another minute or so to start shimmering.

Use just enough to lightly coat the bottom of the pot.

  • Pour in the popcorn kernels and put the lid on the pot. Every 30 seconds or so swirl the pot in a circular motion to keep the kernels from sticking to the bottom and charring.
  • As soon as the first kernel pops you’ll need to be in action mode, swirling the pot constantly while keeping it over the heat to make sure you get maximum poppage and minimum burnage.

Shake what your momma gave ya!

  • Once the popcorn starts to press against the lid and the popping of the kernels comes more than 3 seconds apart remove the pot from the stove and give it a couple more solid swirls to get any stragglers to explode.
  • Pour the popcorn into your serving bowl. Pop your butter in the microwave for 20-30 seconds to melt it down and pour it evenly over the popcorn. Grind on some fresh black pepper, a pinch of salt (the cheese will make up the difference) and a few dashes of parsley flakes.
  • Drizzle truffle oil over the whole lot and grate on Parmagiano Reggiano to your little heart’s content. We suggest stirring things up a bit to ensure even distribution of flavors and adding more of whichever seasoning/accouterments you desire to taste.

We love that truffle funk. Use liberally.

Make it rain parmigiano.

Garlicky Pickled Scallions

A perfect pickled produce for plentiful pairings.

Another one fresh from the fields, this CSA bumper crop works great on sandwiches, chopped up on a hot dog, as a side for BBQ. You know, whatever. Yes we need to learn how to pickle things properly so they last longer but for now stop complaining and just enjoy the fact that we’ve given you yet another brilliant idea that will make you look epicurean in front of your friends.

Equipment Needed: 3 QT Pot with Lid, Wooden Spoon or Whisk, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Measuring Cup

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 12 ish

Suggested Wine Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Suggested Beer Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Ingredients:

  • 2 bunches scallions (about $2/bunch)
  • 5 cloves of garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 1 lemon ($0.50/each)
  • 1 C white vinegar ($2.89/12 oz)
  • 1 C sugar ($2.39/2 lb box)
  • 2 TBSP coarse kosher salt ($2.29/48 oz box)
  • 1 TSP black peppercorns ($3.69/2.25 oz)
  • 1 C water (free)

Preparation:

  • Mix the sugar, vinegar, salt and water in your pot.
  • Cut the root end off your scallions and cut the green leaves off at the point where the stalk starts to turn that light green/white. Pull off the outer layer as it’s usually pretty grungy and wash those puppies thoroughly. Slice them in half lengthwise and set them aside.

Watch your fingers as you slice the scallions down the center.

  • Put your pot over high heat and bring it to a boil. While it’s coming to temperature peel and smash your garlic cloves. Also, cut out a quarter of a lemon and set it aside.

Crush the garlic cloves for maximum flavor diffusion in the pickled mix.

  • Once the vinegar mixture starts boiling add the scallions, garlic, lemon wedge and peppercorns. Stir everything around to make sure it gets coated in the pickling liquid and remove the pot from the heat. Cover the whole lot and let it sit until it comes to room temperature. Store it in an airtight container and refrigerate for at least an hour before serving. Use it to top sandwiches, as an accent for salads, or just an acidic side for fatty dishes.

Golden Beet Relish

A golden accompaniment for anything that needs a multi-flavor kick.

Our CSA is starting to yield more root vegetables and with cold weather coming we’re in a food preservation mode. Quick pickling allows us to get a solid month out of fresh veggies and gives us an excuse to try new combinations for side dishes and potential condiments. The sweet, earthy flavor of the beets along with the vinegary kick make this recipe a great complement to poultry dishes and in any situation you’d normally reach for a gherkin.

Equipment Needed: 2 QT Pot with Lid, Wooden Spoon or Whisk, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Measuring Cup

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 12 ish

Suggested Wine Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Suggested Beer Pairing: Whatever you’re drinking

Ingredients:

  • 3 large beets ($0.99/lb)
  • 2 scallions (about $2/bunch)
  • 1 clove of garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 1 TBSP ground mustard ($3.49/3 oz)
  • 1 C apple cider vinegar ($2.89/32 oz)
  • 1 C sugar ($2.39/2 lb box)
  • 1 TSP black peppercorns ($3.69/2.25 oz)
  • 1 C water (free)

Preparation:

  • Cut the scallions into thin discs, crosswise

Add a little bite and some extra crunch with scallions.

  • Mix the sugar, vinegar, mustard and water in your pot and put over high heat, bringing it to a boil.
  • While the brew is bubbling, peel your beets and slice them carefully with your mandoline or chef’s knife. Take the beet discs and slice them further into little batons (about 1/8th of an inch wide or less). Peel and halve the garlic.
  • Once the vinegar mixture starts to boil add the garlic, scallions and beets. Stir everything together, remove the pot from the heat, cover and let it sit until it comes to room temperature. Store it in an airtight container and refrigerate for at least an hour before serving.

Drop those sweet, earthy slices into the vinegar bath.