Autumn Harvest Apple Sauce

...or you could just have some of that sh*t they sell at the grocery store if you're into terrible food.

...or you could just have some of that sh*t they sell in a jar at the grocery store, if you're into that kind of thing.

One of our favorite things about fall is homemade apple sauce. We refuse to let our beloved remain the afterthought of all side dishes, reserved for the three times a year you actually eat pork chops. Nay fair citizens, justice will be served once you experience how easy it is to make and how delicious fresh apples taste when they’re mashed up with obscene amounts of cinnamon. Join us and get blissfully sauced.

Equipment Needed: 3 QT Pot, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Vegetable Peeler, Wooden Spoon, Potato Masher

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: About 6

Suggested Wine or Beer Pairing: You probably shouldn’t be drinking if you’re only eating apple sauce. Drink whatever you’re drinking with dinner otherwise.

Ingredients:

  • 6-8 medium apples (about $1.50/lb)
  • about 2 TBSP sugar ($1/lb)
  • about 2 TBSP brown sugar ($1.19/lb)
  • about 1/4 C water (free, unless you’re using bottled water to cook with, weirdo)
  • Cinnamon to taste (we use about 4 TBSP) (about $3/3 oz)
  • Salt
  • OPTIONAL: Grade A Dark Amber maple syrup ($8.99/16 oz bottle)

Preparation

You’re probably wondering why all of the ingredient measurements are approximate. The appropriate sweetness for applesauce is an acquired taste, as is the amount of cinnamon. The Brothers Brown use a heavy hand with the latter, and add sugar until we think it looks right. We’ll explain more in a bit.

  • Peel the apples with a vegetable peeler. You can try to use a paring knife if you’re feeling badass but a peeler is safer and quicker. Be sure to remove any stems or those little leaf-like things at the bottom (not sure what they’re called, a Google search only yielded Apple Bottom Jeans).
Peel directly over the trash can. That's working smarter, not harder.

Peel directly over the trash can; work smarter, not harder.

  • Cut the apples in quarters and remove the seeds. Cut each quarter into smaller pieces about an inch wide.
Chop, chop, chop all day long. Chop, chop, chop while you sing this song.

Chop, chop, chop all day long. Chop, chop, chop while you sing this song.

  • Put your pot over medium heat and toss the apples in. Add just enough water so they don’t stick to the bottom.
Add about a quarter cup of water so the apples don't stick and burn.

Add about a quarter cup of water so the apples don't stick and burn.

  • Now here comes the “about” part of the recipe. Add white sugar so there’s a thin, even layer across the top layer of apples. This will probably be about 2 TBSP, but can be more if you want sweeter sauce. Add a little less brown sugar, a dash of salt to even everything out and coat the entire thing with cinnamon (we like to add it until you can’t see apple). Throw in a few tablespoons of maple syrup for another flavor dimension if you wanna get wild.
  • Stir occasionally so the apples don’t stick to the pot. Once things start bubbling pretty well and the fruit softens (about 10 minutes or so), reduce to low heat and go to town with your potato masher. Mush all the apples up until it’s no longer chunky and has the consistency of oatmeal. You can serve it hot for shits and giggles or chill it for about an hour before diving in.
Now is a good time to take out any aggression from your day.

Now is a good time to take out any aggression from your day.

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One response to “Autumn Harvest Apple Sauce

  1. Sounds really delicious ..
    Laila .. http://lailablogs.com/

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