Leek and Bacon Butter

Welcome to your new obsession: trying to figure out the myriad things you can use to make compound butter

Welcome to your new obsession: trying to figure out the myriad things you can use to make compound butter.

We hope you came off your January detox as quickly as we did because we’ve got one more delicious ditty to add to the seemingly infinite lists of food trends for the year: compound butter. Yes folks, it is possible to actually make butter more delicious and it simply entails mixing things in with it. To absolutely no one’s surprise we chose bacon as our gateway compound. But wait, there’s more! We also caramelized some leeks to give it a sweet and slightly vegetal backbone. You can use this to make any dish more interesting (potatoes, roasted veggies and pasta come to mind) but we’re betting you’ll do what we did and just end up eating most of it on fresh bread. Resolutions be damned.

Equipment Needed: Frying Pan, Spatula, Serving Spoon, Small Mixing Bowl, Medium Mixing Bowl, Chef’s Knife, Cutting Board, Parchment Paper or Wax Paper, Plastic Wrap

Serving Suggestion: Family Style

Servings: 8-10

Suggested Wine Pairing: whatever you’re drinking

Suggested Beer Pairing: whatever you’re drinking

Ingredients:

  • 1 stick and 3 TBSP unsalted butter (divided) ($4.99/lb)
  • 1 small leek (about $2.99/lb)
  • 1 clove garlic ($2.99/lb)
  • 4 slices thick cut bacon ($7.99/lb)

Preparation:

  • Do two things before you start to save yourself a lot of mess 1)Put a stick of butter in your medium mixing bowl. You want it room temperature when you’re ready to make things compound. 2) Lay out a 12 inch piece of parchment paper so you’re literally ready to roll once the leeks have melted down.
  • Cut the green woody end and the root end off of the leek. Halve it lengthwise and then cut each piece into thin half-moon slices. Put them in your small mixing bowl and pour cold water over everything. Swish them around to loosen the dirt and then drain and pat them dry.
Leeks have a knack for getting dirt in them so you may need to rinse twice.

Leeks have a knack for getting dirt in them so you may need to rinse twice.

  • Peel and mince your garlic clove. Set it aside until later in the leek melting process.
  • Slice the bacon strips crosswise into thin pieces, then chop those pieces into super tiny chunks so they incorporate easier. Place them in the frying pan over medium heat and crisp them up for about 5-8 minutes (you want them crunchy; this isn’t for debate). Remove the pieces and set them on a paper towel to drain, but leave the grease in the pan.
Chop the bacon into tiny pieces so it mixes, spreads and is easier to eat.

Chop the bacon into tiny pieces so it mixes, spreads and is easier to eat.

  • Add the sliced leeks to the pan along with 3 tablespoons of butter. Stir everything around so it’s well-coated and let it sit for a couple of minutes. Stir, let sit, and repeat for about 8-10 minutes then turn the heat to low, add the garlic and cook for another 10-12 minutes until the leeks are well caramelized.
  • Remove the frying pan from the heat and let it cool to room temperature. Add the veggies and the bacon to your small mixing bowl with the softened butter. Using a spoon, slowly fold all that deliciousness evenly into the butter and plop it down on the parchment paper you laid out.
  • The next part is more art than science. Think like you’re rolling up a piece of paper or poster and roll the parchment paper around the compound butter.
Hold the ends of the paper and roll down to meld the butter together.

Hold the ends of the paper and roll down to meld the butter together.

  • Once you’re satisfied with the tubeness of your butter, put a piece of plastic wrap around the whole lot and twist the ends to seal everything up. Let it sit in the fridge for at least an hour before you serve. It’ll last in the icebox for up to 5 days but that probably won’t be an issue.
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3 responses to “Leek and Bacon Butter

  1. I love compound butters. This sounds like a very tasty one.

  2. Pingback: Caramelized Onion Butter | Brothers Brown School of Cooking

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